Vote NO on Amendment 74: The Taxpayer Loses on All Fronts!

Amendment 74 is the most dangerous ballot issue in decades. It would require compensation of property owners for any reduction in their property value as a result of government regulation. If it passes, Colorado will completely lose the ability to protect the environment and public health. Proponents always claim that such measures protect private property rights. In actuality, however, they elevate one class of property over all others.

Environmental regulations are nearly always among the first targeted by this kind of action, because compliance with a regulation costs money. Any money an industry must spend to protect the environment is a direct reduction in profit margin, thus a reduction in “fair market value.” Amendment 74 would allow industry to claim payment for its loss from the government involved (ie. from us). In order to enact or enforce any regulation protecting public health and the environment, government would have to pay the polluter or developer to comply. Since no level of government – state, county, municipal – operates at a surplus, they wouldn’t have the funds to pay polluters, thus the only option they have is to eliminate regulations.

Some examples:
Land use regulations requiring buffer zones and green space for wildlife? Gone.
Requirements for companies to reclaim land they have mined? Gone.
Scrubbers on smokestacks to reduce acid rain and snow? Gone.
Regulations requiring berms around construction sites to prevent sedimentation of streams? Gone.
Regulations to protect water quality from discharges by mines, breweries, drycleaners, construction sites, feedlots or agricultural facilities? Gone.

Amendment 74, however, isn’t specific to just environmental regulation. It targets ALL regulations. Restaurant health regulations cost money, so those would be eliminated. Zoning regulations that limit certain uses in close proximity to others would also be off the table. We could see adult book stores or pot shops next to schools, oil and gas operations next to hospitals and schools.

Lastly, it’s important to remember that the amendment only applies to private property owners, which in itself increases costs to the public. Governments themselves would still need to meet standards and in fact could face significantly higher costs to do so. For example, federal drinking water standards and wastewater standards would still apply to public water providers; so Denver Water and others would need to provide a safe product. The water flowing into their facilities, however, would be significantly more impaired as a result of the lack of regulations on upstream industries. Guess who will have to pay the increased costs of water treatment to a safe standard? You, the consumer, once again!!

In its purest essence, Amendment 74 requires the people of Colorado to pay industry not to pollute the environment or poison the citizens of the State. Given the extreme threat to public health, our air, water, lands and wildlife, Amendment 74 is the most damaging issue to appear on the ballot in over 20 years. It’s imperative to defeat it in November. Vote NO on Amendment 74.

Please follow and like us:

ST. VRAIN AND LEFT HAND STREAM MANAGEMENT PLAN: COMMUNITY EVENTS

St. Vrain Left Hand Water Conservancy District staff are seeking input on the St. Vrain Left Hand Stream Management Plan process. There are 2 upcoming events in Longmont for you to provide input (see the flyer below). You can also fill out a survey.

This is another opportunity to let officials know that the 150 foot riparian buffer should be maintained and that impervious materials (such as concrete sidewalks and parking lots) should be minimized near bodies of water to prevent stormwater runoff.

thumbnail of Flyer Draft 9-27-2018_Final

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:

Open Space Master Plan Survey Results

As part of the process to update its Open Space Master Plan, the City of Longmont conducted a survey earlier this year to get feedback on community priorities with regards to open space. The City sent out a survey invite to random Longmont residents as well as allowed people who weren’t selected for the survey to respond to the survey questions on the City’s website.

Survey results have now been posted. Of the top 10 findings of the survey, a majority of survey respondents believe additional open space properties should be acquired to keep pace with population growth. Most respondents also believe that the most important function of open space is to protect natural areas from development, and that it is important to preserve wildlife habitat (including rivers, creeks, riparian corridors, and wetlands).

Please follow and like us:

Longmont hears call for community-wide notifications about proposals to develop near stream corridors – Longmont Times-Call

Longmont should establish ways to provide community-wide notices when it gets applications proposing private developments near stream corridors, city-owned open space, greenways and wetlands, a resident told City Council members Tuesday night.

Source: Longmont hears call for community-wide notifications about proposals to develop near stream corridors – Longmont Times-Call

Please follow and like us:

Reminder: Open Space Master Plan Survey Closes April 1st

Longmont’s Natural Resources Department is still seeking comments from residents regarding its update of the city’s Open Space Master Plan until Monday, April 1st. Please consider making your voice heard by responding to the survey. It only takes a couple of minutes. You can find the survey here .

Please follow and like us:

Take the Survey for the Longmont Open Space Master Plan

The Longmont Natural Resources department has posted an online survey for citizens to provide their input regarding the Open Space Master Plan.  You can find the survey here .

A second community workshop for the master plan update is scheduled for Thursday, March 22, from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM, at the Sunset Campus, 7 South Sunset Street.  You can find more details here .

See you there!

 

Please follow and like us:

Open Space Master Plan – 1st Workshop Notes

If you were unable to attend the first workshop on February 22 for the Longmont Open Space Master Plan update, you can find the notes for that meeting here at this link.

The next workshop will take place on Thursday, March 22, 2018, from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM, at the city’s Sunset Campus, 7 South Sunset Street.  The theme of the workshop will be “Examining Options.”

Please follow and like us:

Open Space Master Plan Community Workshop

Longmont’s Department of Public Works & Natural Resources is in the process of updating the City’s Open Space Master Plan. The intent of this comprehensive plan is to evaluate Longmont’s open space needs to proactively plan for the future. To that end, the city is holding an interactive community workshop on February 22, 2018 from 7-9pm at the Natural Resources building located at 7 South Sunset Street Longmont, CO 80501. 

The original plan is 16 years old (2002) and a lot has changed since then.  Let your voice be heard as the city revises its plan for Longmont’s Open Space!

  • The meeting will consist of a presentation and interactive work stations. Participants will be asked a variety of questions to evaluate the open space accomplishments over the past 15 years and to assess the needs of the community that should be addressed in this updated comprehensive plan.
  • Dinnertime snacks will be provided during a welcome period from 6:30 – 7pm just before the meeting.
  • Participants should plan to attend for the full time.
  • Youth participation is encouraged.
  • Spanish translators will be available.
Please follow and like us: